Hadrian Mendoza

ceramic artist

Hadrian Mendoza, a stoneware Potter, works with a fearless and audacious search for unusual and indigenous forms, including expressionistic and abstract shapes. Mendoza was a graduate at Mary Washington College in Virginia and a former student at the Corcoran School of Art in Washington DC, where he was awarded the prestigious Anne and Arnold Abramson award for Excellence in Ceramics in 1996-1997.  He also organized the 1st Southeast Asian Ceramics Festival under the 2007-2009 Toyota Foundation Japan Grant. He curated the 2nd Southeast Asian Ceramics Conference and Exhibition in Fuping Pottery Art Village’s FLICAM International Ceramics Museum in China. 

In 1997 he searched for his roots and moved back to the Philippines, where he slowly metamorphosed into an individualistic and nationalistic artist with a keen and hungry eye for Southeast Asia’s indigenous forms. He has made deliberate attempts at achieving heavy cultural undertones for his works. A humble craftsman, Mendoza serves at the feet of his own cultural dilemmas as an artist.

His works are permanent collections in museums in Cambodia,  China, Korea, Japan, and 3 of the main museums in the Philippines, which are The Metropolitan Museum Manila, The Ayala Museum, and BenCab Museum.

INTERSECTION

| INVITATION | Opening Reception of Intersection : the latest solo exhibition of Filipino stoneware potter Hadrian Mendoza on Tuesday, 25 June 2019 at 6:30 PM
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Sentro Rizal Washington DC is pleased to invite you to a reception to formally open Intersection, the latest solo exhibition of internationally-renowned Filipino stoneware potter Hadrian Mendoza, on Tuesday, 25, June 2019, 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM, at the Philippine Chancery Annex Building. 
This event marks Mendoza’s 29th solo exhibition as he explores themes such as the intersection of cultures, materials, people and lines. Mendoza has lived in the Philippines and in the United States as his works reflect a common ground between both cultures.

Bloom, the main installation in the exhibition is composed of intersecting lines made of dirt and porcelain flowers. A figure pouring a watering can nurtures the growth of the budding flowers. This recreation of the bulol rice terrace god is an installation about the positive impact he has as a teacher tending to his students, which are represented by porcelain flowers. The lines made of dirt that intersect at several points represent cultures, ideas and people crossing paths. After being back and forth between the Philippines and the US, the artist also sees this installation as a map composed of roads that he has travelled.

Hadrian has also created a series of busts and large sculptures of heads. Some have 2 faces, one on each side having different emotions. In one particular piece titled Intersection, a face with orthodontic braces has lines embossed on the top of its head. These intersecting lines represent our thoughts and decisions, all crossing at different points. The emotion on its face shows tension, similar to the tension created by tightening one’s braces.

Dangerous Flower, a series of 12 bulbous forms depict the stages of a flower in bloom. The forms speak of the dichotomy between danger and beauty coexisting in one piece. Tusk-like porcelain protrusions grow from the bulbs in intricate spiral and circular designs. The series represents growth, which is evident in the transformation of the porcelain tusks.

Filipino themes are also explored in this collection with themes that include the Ifugao bulol rice terrace gods of the northern region in the Philippines. The bulol are believed to contain spirits that ensure abundant harvests and protection from natural catastrophe. The Manunggul jar also serves as inspiration for Mendoza. The Manunggul jar is a secondary burial jar that was found in the Tabon caves in Palawan. Mendoza’s interpretation of the jar is represented by a circle on a plinth with the boat and two figures on top. The exhibition also includes functional wares such as Ikebana jars, bowls, and tea sets.

The exhibition takes place at the Philippine Chancery Annex at 1617 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington DC 20036 from June 25 to July 25, 2019.

For more information about Hadrian Mendoza, please visit http://www.hadrianmendozapottery.com.

RSVP to the opening reception here: https://forms.gle/e4JJbecprijk8VLb6

Invitation Mendoza.jpg

TREE OF LIFE: 4th Southeast Asian Ceramics Festival

“Tree of Life: 4th Southeast Asian Ceramics Festival”  by Hadrian Mendoza  The tree of Life has been a common symbol associated with cosmography and religion throughout Southeast Asia.   Southeast Asia reflects the ethnic and religious diversity of the region’s people who have beliefs rooted in Buddhism, Islam, Christianity and Hindu.  Through this exhibition, 40 artists explored their roots in relation to “The Tree of Life.”  Despite different religious backgrounds they have come together to discover how this sacred tree connects them to the past and to the next life.   As artists, they have imagined and created a piece that maps the heavens and the earth through a material that has been used since humans have walked this planet.  On the opening day celebration of the exhibit, the last candle burned down in the pitch-dark lobby of The Ayala Museum in Makati, Philippines as darkness and silence filled the room.  The audience broke out in cheers and applause as performance and ceramic artist Jason Lim had just completed his piece titled “The Cycle” in which he balanced a branch from a cherry tree on his head, 12 feet in length, for almost 1 hour.  During the performance the audience was encouraged to participate by lighting candles and fusing them to the branch using melted wax.  The performance lasted the amount of time that it took for the final candle to burn down.  This was the end of Lim’s performance, and at the same time marked the beginning of the opening reception of “Tree of Life” exhibition, which took place at the 3rd floor gallery of The Ayala Museum from November 28, 2016 to January 15, 2017.  The event also included a 3 day workshop oflectures and demonstrations by presenting artists Soe Yu Nwe (Myanmar), Pang Swee Tuan (Singapore), Jason Lim (Singapore), Sekporn Tansripraparsiri (Thailand), Pim Sudhikam (Thailand), Noi Morton Gonzales (Philippines), Tessie Baldo (Philippines) and Eiair (Thailand).  Artists who exhibited their works include Thomas Cheong, Hui Min Teo, Todd Tok, Alvin Tan Teck Heng, Steven Low, Nelson Lim, Ng Yang Ce and Madhvi Subrahmanian from Singapore, Suwanee Natewong, Krisaya Luenganantakul, Nino Sarabutra, Smith Takroodkaew, Naidee Changmoh and Sayumporn Kasornsuwan from Thailand,  Hadrian Mendoza, Winnie Go, Mark Valenzuela, Pablo Capati, Rita Badilla-Gudio, Jon Pettyjohn, Tessy Pettyjohn, Siegrid Bangyay, Krista Nogueras and Catcat Mendoza from the Philippines, Vooi Yam Tan, James Seet, Cheah Yeow Seng and Lileng Wong from Malaysia, Antin Sambodo, Endang Lestari, Natas Setiabudhi and Chia Huie from Indonesia.  A wide range of techniques were demonstrated such as cutting with wires to create a waved texture, using drill bits of varied sizes to emulate a coral reef,  attaching coils of different thicknesses and lengths to create roots of a tree, sculpting a human torsoby addition and subtraction, and even using needles as tools to create tiny sculptures that seem to be microscopic.  Participants also gave lectures about their works and specific customs related to their respective countries.  The pieces in the exhibition reflected personal ideas and interpretations of the theme.  There were many images related to that of a tree, including branches, stumps, leaves, birds nests, cacti and roots.  There were also symbolic images such as thoughts from one’s mind, achieving zen through audio headphones, corals and arms grabbing one another.  “Tree of Life” marks the 4th of a series of Southeast Asian ceramics conferences that travel the globe and focus on introducing contemporary ceramic artists from this region, and at the same time creating a synergy and tight bond among the participants.  The Southeast Asian region is made up of 10 countries which include Thailand, Myanmar, Singapore, the Philippines, Vietnam, Laos, Brunei, Cambodia, Malaysia and Indonesia.  This group is referred to as SEApots and is comprised of over 150 ceramic artists from these countries.  The concept and formation of SEApots was developed by this author and was made possible through generous grants from Toyota Foundation Japan,  Asian Cultural Council, FLICAM museums and The Ayala Foundation.

“Tree of Life: 4th Southeast Asian Ceramics Festival”

by Hadrian Mendoza

The tree of Life has been a common symbol associated with cosmography and religion throughout Southeast Asia.   Southeast Asia reflects the ethnic and religious diversity of the region’s people who have beliefs rooted in Buddhism, Islam, Christianity and Hindu.  Through this exhibition, 40 artists explored their roots in relation to “The Tree of Life.”  Despite different religious backgrounds they have come together to discover how this sacred tree connects them to the past and to the next life.   As artists, they have imagined and created a piece that maps the heavens and the earth through a material that has been used since humans have walked this planet.

On the opening day celebration of the exhibit, the last candle burned down in the pitch-dark lobby of The Ayala Museum in Makati, Philippines as darkness and silence filled the room.  The audience broke out in cheers and applause as performance and ceramic artist Jason Lim had just completed his piece titled “The Cycle” in which he balanced a branch from a cherry tree on his head, 12 feet in length, for almost 1 hour.  During the performance the audience was encouraged to participate by lighting candles and fusing them to the branch using melted wax.  The performance lasted the amount of time that it took for the final candle to burn down.  This was the end of Lim’s performance, and at the same time marked the beginning of the opening reception of “Tree of Life” exhibition, which took place at the 3rd floor gallery of The Ayala Museum from November 28, 2016 to January 15, 2017.

The event also included a 3 day workshop oflectures and demonstrations by presenting artists Soe Yu Nwe (Myanmar), Pang Swee Tuan (Singapore), Jason Lim (Singapore), Sekporn Tansripraparsiri (Thailand), Pim Sudhikam (Thailand), Noi Morton Gonzales (Philippines), Tessie Baldo (Philippines) and Eiair (Thailand).  Artists who exhibited their works include Thomas Cheong, Hui Min Teo, Todd Tok, Alvin Tan Teck Heng, Steven Low, Nelson Lim, Ng Yang Ce and Madhvi Subrahmanian from Singapore, Suwanee Natewong, Krisaya Luenganantakul, Nino Sarabutra, Smith Takroodkaew, Naidee Changmoh and Sayumporn Kasornsuwan from Thailand,  Hadrian Mendoza, Winnie Go, Mark Valenzuela, Pablo Capati, Rita Badilla-Gudio, Jon Pettyjohn, Tessy Pettyjohn, Siegrid Bangyay, Krista Nogueras and Catcat Mendoza from the Philippines, Vooi Yam Tan, James Seet, Cheah Yeow Seng and Lileng Wong from Malaysia, Antin Sambodo, Endang Lestari, Natas Setiabudhi and Chia Huie from Indonesia.

A wide range of techniques were demonstrated such as cutting with wires to create a waved texture, using drill bits of varied sizes to emulate a coral reef,  attaching coils of different thicknesses and lengths to create roots of a tree, sculpting a human torsoby addition and subtraction, and even using needles as tools to create tiny sculptures that seem to be microscopic.  Participants also gave lectures about their works and specific customs related to their respective countries.

The pieces in the exhibition reflected personal ideas and interpretations of the theme.  There were many images related to that of a tree, including branches, stumps, leaves, birds nests, cacti and roots.  There were also symbolic images such as thoughts from one’s mind, achieving zen through audio headphones, corals and arms grabbing one another.

“Tree of Life” marks the 4th of a series of Southeast Asian ceramics conferences that travel the globe and focus on introducing contemporary ceramic artists from this region, and at the same time creating a synergy and tight bond among the participants.  The Southeast Asian region is made up of 10 countries which include Thailand, Myanmar, Singapore, the Philippines, Vietnam, Laos, Brunei, Cambodia, Malaysia and Indonesia.  This group is referred to as SEApots and is comprised of over 150 ceramic artists from these countries.  The concept and formation of SEApots was developed by this author and was made possible through generous grants from Toyota Foundation Japan,  Asian Cultural Council, FLICAM museums and The Ayala Foundation.

Kohler Bold. Art. Asia. exhibition hits the Philippine shores

Kohler Bold. Art. Asia to hit Philippine shores on May 18-24

Six artists from Asia create exquisitely crafted pieces for Kohler’s Bold. Art. Asia Exhibition to be showcased in The Gallery, Greenbelt 5

Manila, Philippines – After successful exhibitions in Thailand, Indonesia, South Korea, and Singapore, the Kohler Bold. Art. Asia Exhibition finally makes its way to the Philippines. Running from May 18 to 24 at The Gallery in Greenbelt 5, Kohler brings 12 art pieces by artists from Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, The Philippines, and Vietnam.

Kohler has been involved in the Arts and has been supporting art for more than 40 years since the launch of its Arts/Industry program in the US. More than 500 emerging and established artists have finished their residency program in the headquarters. In recent years, Kohler has brought this to Asia, first introducing the said program last 2012 in China. Since then, different programs and projects to promote the arts in Asia have been organized by Kohler, and this year, Kohler continues to put emphasis on their commitment to the arts and support of Asian artists through the Kohler Bold.Art Exhibition.

“Through organizing this program, we aim at promoting art and supporting the local artists from Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, The Philippines and Vietnam by giving them international exposure,” said Benjamin Chang, Kohler Marketing Communication Manager for South East Asia.

The featured artists include Ahadiat Joedawinata from Indonesia, James Seet from Malaysia, Thomas Cheong from Singapore, Sudsiri Pui-Ock from Thailand, Nguyen Ngoc Lam from Vietnam, and Hadrian Mendoza from The Philippines. The six explored the theme “Asian Contemporary Art: Rooted in the Past; Looking into the Future” from their own cultural and personal point of view.

“In the future, we will continue to proactively promote art in Asia. We hope to collaborate with different parties, like developers, local artists, art associations to organize art exhibitions in different cities in Asia,” ends Chang.

For more information on the Kohler Bold. Art. Exhibition, please visit http://blog.kohlerboldart.com/about.php.